Saturday, 26 August 2017

A Cartoon & Comic Book Tour of #London No.26: The First #Christmas (!!) Card

Daily Constitutional Editor Adam writes…

Every year at this busy time I dig into the archives of The Daily Constitutional and repost a few favourites - it allows me to enjoy the school holidays with my daughter and still lead my London Walks tours.

This year I'm reposting my Cartoon & Comic Book Tour of London - a series of posts tracing the inky footsteps left behind in our capital by everyone from William Hogarth to Scooby Doo. It's been one of the most popular series of all on The Daily Constitutional and I'm looking forward to updating it after the holidays with posts on Captain America, the X-Men, George Cruikshank and Mary Darly. In the meantime, here's the story so far…


This post first appeared in December 2015 – so it's NOT very seasonal (reposting here in August 2017!) but I hope you enjoy it nevertheless as part of this virtual Cartoon & Comic Book tour…



Panel 26: The First Christmas Card


The tale of the first commercially produced Christmas card is well known. The year was 1843, it was the idea of this fellow…


… who lived here in Hampstead…






… and it looked like this…


 

The card was the work of John Calcott Horsley, rector and treasurer of the Royal Academy, painter of historical scenes and illustrator.

A handy cartoonist, too, if his Christmas card is anything to go by.


In the 1880s he became a subject of the cartoonist's satirical pen when he opposed the modish French practise of painting nude life models.

Punch magazine dubbed him "Mr J. C(lothes) Horsley" and presented him thus…




1,000 cards were produced and sold at a shilling apiece (!). They were published by Joseph Cundall at 12 Bond Street.





A London Walk costs £10 – £8 concession. To join a London Walk, simply meet your guide at the designated tube station at the appointed time. Details of all London Walks can be found at www.walks.com.



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